E-scooters aren't going anywhere — in fact, their numbers are still growing

The scooters.... they're multiplying!
The scooters…. they’re multiplying!
Image: vicky leta / mashable

The number of scooters in cities around the world is quickly growing.

Though communities like San Francisco and Santa Monica, Calif. limited the number of scooters companies could offer for rent last year, other cities are still seeing a major increase in the number of available electric two-wheelers.

On Thursday, Lime announced that its scooters and bicycles reached 50 million trips since launching mid-2017. That’s enough mileage to circle the globe twice. Those trips come from a growing, global bike- and-scooter share network that reaches 100 cities in more than 20 countries, and five continents. The latest places Lime e-scooters have landed: Bogota, Colombia and Montevideo, Uruguay. Lime also said its had more than 15 million sign-ups.

In the U.S., Austin, San Diego, and Atlanta are just some of the cities where you can find scooters from a wide range of rental companies like Bird, Lime, Uber’s Jump, Lyft, Bolt, Ford’s Spin, and others. Portland, Oregon, is launching a new yearlong pilot Friday after the success of a smaller one last year. The program will start with 2,500 scooters and could increase by the end of the year to 15,000.

Even San Francisco last week doubled the fleet size for the two e-scooter operators allowed in the city. 

The National Association of City Transportation Officials, which tracks shared micromobility usage throughout the U.S., puts 38.5 million trips on e-scooters in 2018, surpassing bike-share trips (36.5 million trips) for the first time. Throughout 100 U.S. cities NACTO tallied about 85,000 e-scooters available for rent. Other companies are moving beyond American cities, like Bird throughout Europe and in Tel Aviv. 

Where all those scooters hang out.

Where all those scooters hang out.

Image: nacto

Scoot — known for both its red e-scooters and electric mopeds — expanded to Santiago, Chile, and Barcelona, Spain last year, moving well beyond the confines of San Francisco. Madrid has 18 different e-scooter-share companies operating within city limits. In Singapore, 14 scooter companies have applied to bring its fleets there.

William Henderson, CEO and co-founder of Ride Report, a software system that connects cities with scooter operators and scooter data, has watched bicycle advocacy fight for space and infrastructure in cities over the years, but with scooters, “all of a sudden we have this tremendous growth.” After working with different cities, he’s seen demand for scooter-share services continue and not just blip out after the first few months. “This is serving a real need to get around cities efficiently and affordably,” he added.

Lime also released more demographics about its U.S. riders, like how 33 percent are female and 36 identifying as people of color. One-third of Lime riders earn $50,000 or less, according to its rider reports.

A survey of San Francisco scooter riders (on Skip and Scoot vehicles only) released last week at city program’s mid-way point found some different breakdowns, with scooter-riders 82 percent male, 63 percent white, and 68 percent with an income of more than $100,000. 

Uploads%252fvideo uploaders%252fdistribution thumb%252fimage%252f86947%252fef8ecfd6 67aa 4dd5 b653 f0c8f51fa398.jpg%252foriginal.jpg?signature=omueb9igfnozzmqg09bdjo0o eq=&source=https%3a%2f%2fblueprint api production.s3.amazonaws

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Link to original source

Walmart Yodel Boy crowdsurfing on an inflatable horse has deep yeehaw energy

Please enjoy this absolutely transfixing display of yeehaw energy. 

Mason Ramsey, also known as the Walmart Yodel Boy, is already an immortal being in the eyes of the internet. The 12-year-old country sensation captured our hearts with his impossibly small red bow tie and a 2018 Coachella set

His dedication to the yeehaw agenda only intensified during a performance in Nashville on Wednesday. Stagehands laid out a horse-shaped pool float for Mason to gingerly step into, before they lifted him into the air. Like pushing a lone boat off into the night, they gently sent the adolescent cowboy off into a sea of welcoming hands. 

As the opening bars of Mason’s single, “Famous” wafted through the venue, an adult male voice can be heard exclaiming, “Are you kidding me? What!?” 

Tennessean reporter Dave Paulson recorded the incredible experience and blessed all our timelines with this video. 

The only comparable displays of yeehaw energy are Kacey Musgrave’s iconic “I didn’t say fuckin’ yee” at Coachella, or maybe anything that Lil Nas X does. 

It’s just beautiful. 

[h/t:Jezebel]

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Link to original source

Walmart Yodel Boy crowdsurfing on an inflatable horse has deep yeehaw energy

Please enjoy this absolutely transfixing display of yeehaw energy. 

Mason Ramsey, also known as the Walmart Yodel Boy, is already an immortal being in the eyes of the internet. The 12-year-old country sensation captured our hearts with his impossibly small red bow tie and a 2018 Coachella set

His dedication to the yeehaw agenda only intensified during a performance in Nashville on Wednesday. Stagehands laid out a horse-shaped pool float for Mason to gingerly step into, before they lifted him into the air. Like pushing a lone boat off into the night, they gently sent the adolescent cowboy off into a sea of welcoming hands. 

As the opening bars of Mason’s single, “Famous” wafted through the venue, an adult male voice can be heard exclaiming, “Are you kidding me? What!?” 

Tennessean reporter Dave Paulson recorded the incredible experience and blessed all our timelines with this video. 

The only comparable displays of yeehaw energy are Kacey Musgrave’s iconic “I didn’t say fuckin’ yee” at Coachella, or maybe anything that Lil Nas X does. 

It’s just beautiful. 

[h/t:Jezebel]

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Link to original source

Canadian officials: Facebook broke the law and won’t accept responsibility

Canada officials say Facebook won't accept responsibility.
Canada officials say Facebook won’t accept responsibility.
Image: zach gibson / Getty Images

Just one day after Facebook revealed it expects to pay up to $5 billion to the FTC for privacy violations, another country has condemned the social network for breaking its privacy laws. 

Facebook broke Canadian privacy laws, according to officials who say the company refuses to take responsibility for its actions. 

“Facebook has spent more than a decade expressing contrition for its actions and avowing its commitment to people’s privacy, but when it comes to taking concrete actions needed to fix transgressions they demonstrate disregard,” Information and Privacy Commissioner Michael McEvoy said in a statement released by the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada.

Like the FTC inquiry, the Canadian investigation stems from Facebook’s handling of Cambridge Analytica, the data firm that improperly accessed millions of Facebook users’ personal data. More than 600,000 Canadians were caught up in the data leak, officials said. 

Facebook didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment, but Canadian officials said the company “refuses to implement recommendations to address deficiencies,” and that it plans to take Facebook to court, which could ultimately result in more fines.

But, once again, it appears these actions will amount to little more than a slap on the wrist for Facebook. One official, quoted by the New York Times, said these court-imposed fines tend to be “in the tens of thousands of dollars.”

But even if the fines were exponentially higher, it seems little can affect the company. Facebook’s FTC fine will be the largest ever imposed on a tech company, yet Facebook, which reported the impending fine along with $15 billion in quarterly revenue, still saw its stock soar immediately following the news. Facebook added more than $30 billion to its value overnight. 

There are other ways the FTC could punish the company, such as holding Mark Zuckerberg personally accountable, or imposing new rules that would force the company to change how it runs aspects of its business. 

But until that actually happens, it’s clear that fines alone will do little damage.

Uploads%252fvideo uploaders%252fdistribution thumb%252fimage%252f91114%252f5b74bb50 044b 4880 8bda d84a650b2afb.png%252foriginal.png?signature=qskp81kwmqhzwla7 bvzkggbfiq=&source=https%3a%2f%2fblueprint api production.s3.amazonaws

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Link to original source

Canadian officials: Facebook broke the law and won’t accept responsibility

Canada officials say Facebook won't accept responsibility.
Canada officials say Facebook won’t accept responsibility.
Image: zach gibson / Getty Images

Just one day after Facebook revealed it expects to pay up to $5 billion to the FTC for privacy violations, another country has condemned the social network for breaking its privacy laws. 

Facebook broke Canadian privacy laws, according to officials who say the company refuses to take responsibility for its actions. 

“Facebook has spent more than a decade expressing contrition for its actions and avowing its commitment to people’s privacy, but when it comes to taking concrete actions needed to fix transgressions they demonstrate disregard,” Information and Privacy Commissioner Michael McEvoy said in a statement released by the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada.

Like the FTC inquiry, the Canadian investigation stems from Facebook’s handling of Cambridge Analytica, the data firm that improperly accessed millions of Facebook users’ personal data. More than 600,000 Canadians were caught up in the data leak, officials said. 

Facebook didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment, but Canadian officials said the company “refuses to implement recommendations to address deficiencies,” and that it plans to take Facebook to court, which could ultimately result in more fines.

But, once again, it appears these actions will amount to little more than a slap on the wrist for Facebook. One official, quoted by the New York Times, said these court-imposed fines tend to be “in the tens of thousands of dollars.”

But even if the fines were exponentially higher, it seems little can affect the company. Facebook’s FTC fine will be the largest ever imposed on a tech company, yet Facebook, which reported the impending fine along with $15 billion in quarterly revenue, still saw its stock soar immediately following the news. Facebook added more than $30 billion to its value overnight. 

There are other ways the FTC could punish the company, such as holding Mark Zuckerberg personally accountable, or imposing new rules that would force the company to change how it runs aspects of its business. 

But until that actually happens, it’s clear that fines alone will do little damage.

Uploads%252fvideo uploaders%252fdistribution thumb%252fimage%252f91114%252f5b74bb50 044b 4880 8bda d84a650b2afb.png%252foriginal.png?signature=qskp81kwmqhzwla7 bvzkggbfiq=&source=https%3a%2f%2fblueprint api production.s3.amazonaws

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Link to original source