A tennis match ran until after 3 a.m., and you have to admire these sleepy fans

Some people slept away during the latest start to a Australian Open match ever.
Some people slept away during the latest start to a Australian Open match ever.
Image: Julian Finney/Getty Images

The last time you were up past 3 a.m. was probably thanks to a big night out. Or binge-watching something on TV, we get it.

But spare a thought for these tennis fans, who stuck it out at the Australian Open as a match between Garbine Muguruza and Johanna Konta in the tournament’s latest start ever.

As per The Age, the match began just after 12.30am AEDT, thanks to daytime matches which ran overtime. Around 250 fans stuck around and watched on, and yeah, they looked tired.

Image: Julian Finney/Getty Images

Image: PETER PARKS/AFP/Getty Images

The match finally wrapped up at 3:12 a.m., with Muguruza beating Konta 6-4, 6-7 (3), 7-5. It’s safe to say the players involved weren’t so keen on the late start.

“I don’t agree with athletes having to physically exert themselves in the wee hours of the morning,” Konta told the BBC after the match. 

“I don’t think it is healthy — in fact it is quite dangerous … However, Garbine and I were both in the same position and, with the circumstances, we really put on a great match and it’s just a shame more people couldn’t enjoy it.”

It’s not the latest finish to a match in the tournament’s history, however, with that crown belonging to Lleyton Hewitt and Marcos Baghdatis in 2008. Their set finished at 4:34 a.m., after more than 4 hours and 45 minutes of play.

Even the longest match in modern tennis history, an eleven-hour marathon between John Isner and Nicolas Mahut at Wimbledon in 2010, was broken up over two days.

Anyway, here are some more tired-looking fans we can’t help but admire.

Image: PETER PARKS/AFP/Getty Images

Image: PETER PARKS/AFP/Getty Images

The clock at 03.12 a.m.

The clock at 03.12 a.m.

Image: Julian Finney/Getty Images

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Ariana Grande releases neon-drenched music video for '7 Rings'

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Ariana Grande just keeps pumping out the singles, and after one heck of a 2018, she’s back with another video.

The pop star debuted a neon-drenched new video for new single “7 Rings,” the third single from her upcoming fifth album, thank u, next

It’s a “My Favourite Things” sampler of a trap-pop track which hinges around diamond rings the artist bought for herself and her six best friends on a post-breakup shopping trip.

The video was directed by Hannah Lux Davis, who’s also responsible for the ’90s teen movie inspired clip for ex-studded single “thank u, next.

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Naver adds Korean honorific feature to its Papago AI translation app

Naver has added a Korean honorific feature to its translation app to allow foreigners to communicate more accurately in South Korea, the company has announced.

Users of Papago can now turn on or off the honorific mode that will be at the bottom of the app after they perform a English translation.

The Korean language has honorific versions that are spoken to elders or strangers — much like how tu and vous are used in different social situations for French — that affects verb conjugation, adjectives, and pronouns.

Previously, regular speech and honorifics were conflated but users will now be presented with the correct regular translation as well as the honorific translation for texts over 2 sentences long, the South Korean internet giant said.

Naver said it will collect data from honorific translations to further improve its quality. It may later add the feature to other languages besides English, depending on demand.

AI has been extensively applied to speakers and translation apps in South Korea, with SK Telecom adding Hancom’s AI translation app GenieTalk to its AI speaker NUGU.

Meanwhile, KT has installed AI speakers in local hotels to help foreigners.

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Swiss watchmaker's latest jab at the Apple Watch has no hands


H. Moser & Cie

Swiss watchmaker H. Moser & Cie is no stranger to taking digs at the Apple Watch. Its latest form of social commentary, however, is rather unique. The company has unveiled the Swiss Alp Watch Concept Black, a mechanical watch that once more riffs on Apple’s design but doesn’t even have hands or a dial — the only thing on the front is a flying tourbillon mechanism to counteract the effects of gravity. Instead of looking at the watch to check the time, you’re suppose to sound a minute repeater whose chimes will tell you if you’re running late. This is supposed to be a callback to a time when you needed a repeater to tell the time in the dark, but it also happens to resemble an Apple Watch with the screen turned off.

If you want to adjust the time, you have to pull out the crown to see indicators guiding the way. That’s a pain, but at least the chimes are supposed to be powerful. H. Moser hollowed out the middle to create a resonance chamber and produce a powerful, “pure” sound.

But… why? According to H. Moser, it’s an attempt to go back to the roots of watchmaking. This brings the watch to its “rightful place” as a timekeeper rather than a “time-wasting ‘smart’ device displaying notifications,” the company said. If it wasn’t already clear, the firm isn’t too fond of smartwatches and their focus on convenience over tradition and opulence (shh, no one tell Montblanc).

Yes, this is a real product, and Wired noted that H. Moser already sold the first example. It’s already planning to make more. You won’t likely get one even if you’re well off, though. The combination of a platinum case, the unique construction and the intricacy of the tourbillon put its price at a staggering $350,000. There are clearly far less expensive (not to mention more practical) ways to thumb your nose at modern technology. For that matter, it makes the technology in question look like a bargain — you could buy 280 examples of the Apple Watch Series 4 Hermès with that kind of money.

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Seeing M. Night Shyamalan’s Split Was One of My Most Memorable Moviegoing Experiences

This is the moment when it all fell into place.
Photo: Universal

Imagine sitting down for a movie. You don’t know what that movie is but when it’s over you realize you’ve been watching a secret sequel to one of your favorite movies of all time. That’s what happened to me when I first saw M. Night Shyamalan’s Split, and it was one of the best experiences I’ve ever had in a movie theater.

With Glass coming out this week, it seemed like a good time to tell my unique, unexpected tale. Though Spilt opened for general audiences in January of 2017, I saw it about four months earlier, September 2016, at Fantastic Fest in Austin, Texas. Fantastic Fest is one of the world’s largest genre film festivals, and it’s both run by, and takes place at, the Alamo Drafthouse. Each year the festival has at least one, sometimes two, Secret Screenings. You have no idea what you’re going to watch until the lights go down and the movie begins. Last year it was Suspiria, but in other years the fest showed Cloud Atlas, There Will Be Blood, Crimson Peak, a ton of stuff. You never know what it’s going to be but it’s always cool and a big surprise. Back in 2016, it was Split.

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No matter what the film is, often times, the best part of the Secret Screenings is the speculation. In the days and hours leading up to it, the whole thing becomes a huge, buzzing topic of conversation at the festival. In this instance, late 2016, everyone was dying to see maybe Rogue One or Fantastic Beasts. Now, Disney or Warner Bros. would never screen those, but that’s how wild the hype gets. I even remember people guessing that Rian Johnson could screen a rough cut of The Last Jedi a year a half before it was released because he’d been to the festival before. Moral of the story? The speculation can be exceptionally silly.

Eventually, realistic guesses start to join the conversation and even some insider knowledge. In 2016, the big insider tip I heard was that the festival was excited this particular filmmaker was attending. So, simple enough, I brought up a release schedule and looked at films that came out in the next couple months, had prominent directors, fit the genre flavor of the festival, and could hypothetically screen there.

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James McAvoy’s performance in Split is excellent.
Photo: Universal

Immediately one movie jumped out: M. Night Shyamalan’s Split, which most of my friends agreed was a decent guess. So after we walked into the theater, listened to the mysterious introduction and the lights went down, I was less surprised than most to see that the movie was, in fact, Split.

It’s important, again, to note this was about four months before the movie came out in theaters. All we really knew about Split then was James McAvoy played a person with multiple personalities who kidnapped some girls, which was gleaned from the first and only trailer at the time, which came out in July of 2016. Honestly though? I don’t even remember watching that trailer. I had liked Shyamalan’s last film, The Visit (which I even interviewed him for), so I was optimistic about this new, low-budget thriller road he was taking. Fast forward about 112 minutes. I had enjoyed Split. It was well done, creepy, and with an incredible lead performance by McAvoy. You can read more thoughts on it in my review from the time.

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And then this happened.

About 20 seconds into the below clip (which is the last two minutes and 30 seconds of Split) you’ll notice a few notes of music. Those notes of music, at least to me, were instantly recognizable as James Newton Howard’s score from Unbreakable, a scored I adored and listened to regularly for almost 16 years.

I heard that music and sat up straight in my chair. I felt my friend looking at me strangely. “Let him show the world how powerful we can be,” says McAvoy’s character, Kevin. That, coupled with the music, lead me to lean over to my friend and say “Holy shit, it’s an Unbreakable movie.”

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Now, I can’t be 100 percent sure of this next part—the other 300 people in that theater were all very film savvy—but clocking in with a time of roughly 20 seconds, it’s distinctly possible I was the first person in that room to put this together. In fact, to this day, my friend swears that I was. If that’s true, since this was the film’s world premiere, it’s also possible I may have been the first general audience member to figure it out in the world. Unlikely, but possible. I digress.

That idea of someone with power showing the world their true identity is the core of Mr. Glass’s beliefs in Unbreakable so I was sure Shyamalan was up to something related to that. I sat up further in my chair. The Unbreakable score then really kicks in as the “Split” title card comes up, marking the end of one movie but also letting the audience know something is still happening. It was at this point, I’d assume, other fans started to sniff out the twist.

The film cuts to a diner with a TV playing the news. Howard’s score continues to play. After hearing a report on the events in the movie, a girl says “This is like that crazy guy in a wheelchair they put away 15 years ago. They gave him a funny name too. What was it?” And then, there he was. The big reveal. Bruce Willis himself, reprising his role from a movie released 16 years earlier, to answer the woman’s question. “Mr. Glass,” he said, making all my Unbreakable dreams come true. The score crescendos and the credits roll.

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I imagine, at this moment, my expression something like this.
Photo: Universal

I cheered. Loudly. I don’t remember much else. I’m sure there were tears (based on the fact that simply remembering the moment right now brings them up). I’m sure I said “I told you! I called it!” to the people around me. I may have even jumped out of my seat. It’s all a blur because, really, how do you react to something like that? When you find out the movie you’ve just been watching is actually a sequel to a film you have such a huge emotional connection to?

If Unbreakable didn’t have the same impact on you as it did me, think of your favorite movie. For argument’s sake, let’s say it’s Back to the Future. Now, take that filmmaker’s seemingly unrelated new movie. Say, Welcome to Marwen. Imagine if, at the end of Welcome to Marwen, Michael J. Fox and Christopher Lloyd appeared in a brand new DeLorean and said to the main character, “Mark, we have to take you back to the future!” Yes, that’s an odd example but it’s almost less odd than imagining Split would have somehow been related to Unbreakable at that time. I freaked out. I buzzed about it. I’m still buzzing about it.

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After the crowd (some of whom had never seen Unbreakable and didn’t know why a lot of us were so excited) stopped cheering, Shyamalan came out to do a Q&A. He was happy that we were all excited and surprised and said he hoped that, as hard as it may be in an era of spoilers and the internet, we’d all keep the twist a surprise until the film came out. He was asking several thousand people at a film festival to keep a giant story a secret from the world for months. I immediately pulled out my phone, brought up Twitter and searched “Unbreakable.”

Watching over spoilers like…
Photo: Disney

There were tweets. Things like “Split is a secret sequel to Unbreakable!” “If you love Unbreakable, you have to see Split!” I was disgusted. I knew movie news sites would pick that up instantly and use the spoiler for their own benefit, and in the process ruin the possibility of other people having the electrifying experience I just had. That’s simply the world we live in.

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But, after Shyamalan said that, the tweets went away. Or at least were buried and forgotten. Time passed and though I wanted to shout it from the rooftops, neither I nor the other attendees of the festival did. It stayed secret. Soon, Split opened and was a hit, which allowed Shyamalan to complete his master plan, bringing everyone back together for what would become Glass. I even got to talk to him about the reveal at the time, which you can read here.

And so, with great anticipation, I sat down in a theater last week and saw the ending of a story that has many great memories attached to it for me. And no, it didn’t turn out how I’d hoped. But if having Glass means I get to relive that incredible evening in September 2016 again and tell you all about it? Well, it’s worth it.

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Glass is in theaters Friday. Unbreakable and Split are now on DVD and Blu-ray.


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