TikTok's owner launches chat app with a focus on communities

Sponsored Links


VCG via Getty Images

TikTok’s owner, ByteDance, has jumped into the wide world of messaging apps. The company has released Flipchat (aka Feiliao), an “interest-based social app” for Android and iOS that combines the usual chats and video calls with a social network-style feed, chat groups and forums. While you can communicate like you would in other chat apps, the emphasis here is on participating in a community. If you’re a fan of a movie, you can discuss it in a myriad of ways.

The app is currently limited to China, and TechCrunch noted that it appears intended more to take on the Reddit-style app Jike than messaging giants like WeChat. Facebook might not have to worry about Flipchat in the near future. ByteDance is growing rapidly, representing over 11 percent of Chinese users’ time spent on super apps. And TikTok’s rapid international growth caught many people by surprise. It wouldn’t be surprising if some of that success translated to Flipchat, at least if it expands beyond a Chinese audience.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Link to original source

The Morning After: Impossible Foods' next project is sausage meat

Sponsored Links


Impossible Foods

Welcome back! We kick off the week with bad news for Huawei as Google complies with US government requirements regarding the phone maker, suspending the transfer of proprietary hardware and software. In better news for the planet, we go behind the scenes at Impossible Foods and the development of its non-meat meat. Burgers, it seems, were just the beginning.


How a burger maker became a “platform.”
Impossible Foods’ rising empire of almost-meat

Impossible says it wants to create a parallel universe of not-animal products — not just burger patties but also steak and even eggs. “The primary goal is to effectively eliminate the use of animals in the food system,” said founder and CEO Pat Brown. The big challenge is changing a fundamental cultural idea, backed by powerful industrial forces: Meat has to come from animals.


We tried the plant-based meat in a breakfast sandwich and siu mai.
Impossible Foods’ next product is sausage

After three years of selling convincing plant-based burgers, Impossible Foods is on the verge of releasing its next product: sausage. For Chris Ip, Impossible cooked up a sausage patty for a breakfast sandwich and folded the ground meat into steamed siu mai, showing its versatility. The sausage is one of many new foods — including eggs and steak — the company has been testing the waters for as it bills itself as a “platform” for creating custom proteins rather than a vegan-burger manufacturer. It’s all very Food 2.0.


It would lose Google apps and future OS updates.
Google suspends Huawei’s Android support (updated)

Reuters sources claim Google has suspended transactions with Huawei that require transferring proprietary hardware and software, hobbling much of its smartphone business outside China. It “immediately” loses access to future OS updates beyond the Android Open Source Project, according to the insider, and upcoming phones would have to go without official apps like the Google Play Store and Gmail. It’s huge news for Huawei, and not in the good way.


The most basic one will set us back $9.90.
Arduino’s new Nano board family is more powerful and affordable

Arduino’s Nano line will soon welcome four new products. They’re all small boards like the classic one, making Nano a family of small boards meant for compact projects. All the new boards boast low energy consumption and processors more powerful than the classic. Even better, they’re all pretty affordable: The most basic entry, called Nano Every, is good for “everyday” projects and can replace the classic Nano.


Because we all know most children are space cadets.
Using tech to keep your kids organized and on task

Gone are the days of trusty Moleskine 18-month planners, scraps of to-do lists and family calendars hanging on the fridge. Full-time jobs and older kids mean more clubs, more appointments, more social life. Making a move to digital organization can take a load off and breathe new life into the family. Often you have the apps and software on hand — you just need to rethink how you use them.

But wait, there’s more…


The Morning After is a new daily newsletter from Engadget designed to help you fight off FOMO. Who knows what you’ll miss if you don’t Subscribe.

Craving even more? Like us on Facebook or Follow us on Twitter.

Have a suggestion on how we can improve The Morning After? Send us a note.

All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

109
Shares

Share

Tweet

Share

Save




Comments

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Link to original source

Victim group says UK's revenge porn laws aren't working

Sponsored Links


RyanKing999 via Getty Images

The UK’s move to treat revenge porn as a specific crime was supposed to catch perpetrators who’d otherwise slip through the cracks, but that doesn’t appear to have worked out in practice. The Revenge Porn helpline has collected police data showing that the number of related charges dropped 23 percent between the periods of 2015-2016 and 2018-2019 despite the number of investigations more than doubling over the same space of time. Just 158 people faced charges, the helpline said. The shortfall is pinned on both shortcomings in the law itself as well as a lack of understanding from police.

As revenge porn is treated like a communications crime rather than a sexual crime, victims aren’t guaranteed anonymity. They might be afraid to speak out knowing that the culprit might retaliate, and over a third of victims from the past year have decided against pursuing cases. Police, meanwhile, frequently don’t know how to handle the crime. A 2017 University of Suffolk study showed that 95 percent of officers hadn’t had any training on the subject.

The country’s Home Office and Ministry of Justice defended the practice in a mutual statement, saying they’d worked with victims and activists who agreed that revenge porn shouldn’t be considered a sex offense since the intentions were “almost always malicious” rather than sexual. Whether or not that’s true, that doesn’t alleviate concerns that the law might need tweaking to prove effective and deter people from treating sensitive photos as weapons.

All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Link to original source

Hackers turn tables on account hijackers by stealing forum data

Sponsored Links


weerapatkiatdumrong via Getty Images

Online account hijackers received a taste of ironic punishment this week. KrebsOnSecurity has learned that hackers stole the database from the popular hijacker forum OGusers on May 12th, obtaining email addresses, hashed passwords, IP addresses and private forum messages for 112,988 accounts. The administrator initially told users that a hard drive failure had wiped out the information and forced the use of a backup, but that tall tale fell apart when the administrator of a rival forum made the data public.

The incident reportedly sparked chaos, with users receiving phishing emails. The main OGusers administrator even turned off self-bans so that users couldn’t leave and theoretically cover some of their tracks.

The hack’s consequences could extend significantly beyond giving account thieves and SIM hijackers a taste of their proverbial medicine. There’s a real chance law enforcement has its hands on the forum data. This could lead to more arrests, not to mention leads on existing cases. Don’t be surprised if some of the users go quiet, or at least scramble to change email addresses and logins.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Link to original source

Many of the Brexit Party's Twitter followers appear to be bots

Sponsored Links


AP Photo/Rui Vieira

It’s not shocking to see Twitter bots latch on to a political campaign, but it’s not often they do so soon after a campaign starts — let alone on a large scale. That appears to be the case with the UK’s Brexit Party, however. The no-deal EU withdrawal party is only a few months old, but researchers talking to BuzzFeed News found that many of its Twitter accounts are networks of bots and other inauthentic users. The exact amount isn’t clear, but F-Secure’s Andy Patel noted that over 8,800 users — roughly 7 percent of the party’s Twitter base — were both recently recreated and disproportionately responsible for retweeting party material.

Some of these accounts have been producing massive volumes of tweets focused on Brexit, and clearly in unrealistic amounts. One tweeted 823 times in the space of a day. Some are new, while others are from outside the UK. Regardless of behavior, the surge of new followers for the party suggested “inorganic” behavior.

Just who is behind the accounts isn’t clear. It could be “astroturfing” where organizers or supporters artificially inflate follower counts and messages to make the party seem more popular than it is. However, it could also represent an outside influence campaign trying the familiar tactic of stoking political tensions to weaken the country’s resolve. A spokesperson claimed the party didn’t have any more control over individuals creating accounts than it did “the weather,” but that didn’t address concerns about highly automated account creation or buying legions of fake followers.

Twitter has banned at least seven of the suspicious accounts, and a spokesperson maintained that the social network would “robustly enforce” its policies. There are anti-abuse measures Twitter is taking that the researchers can’t see, the representative added. However, BuzzFeed understood that Twitter hadn’t found evidence of a coordinated plot and didn’t consider the Brexit debate to be a major problem. There’s something questionable happening, though, and this at least suggests that it’s good to be wary when politically motivated groups enjoy a sudden rush of popularity on social networks.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Link to original source