US recommends Windows users patch against worm vulnerability

Sponsored Links


Matt Anderson Photography via Getty Images

Microsoft Windows users who haven’t patched their OS (or are using an unsupported version) are at risk of attackers exploiting a vulnerability known as BlueKeep. The Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA), Homeland Security’s lead cybersecurity agency, said it successfully tested a working exploit for the BlueKeep vulnerability. Specifically, the agency was able to remotely run code on a Windows 2000 computer using BlueKeep, it stated in an advisory. The bug effects computers that are running Windows 7 or earlier (as well as Windows Server 2003 and 2008), and gives potential attackers access through Microsoft’s Remote Desktop Services.

The BlueKeep vulnerability is “wormable”, meaning an attacker only has to gain access to one computer in order to gain control of all the other devices on its network. Microsoft already issued patches for the bug last month, but private security firm Errata estimated that millions of devices still remain vulnerable. While an attacker has yet to take advantage of the bug, doing so could easily lead to a repeat of 2017’s WannaCry malware outbreak that impacted systems worldwide, including Britain’s NHS, Honda and FedEx.

CISA is asking users of older Microsoft systems to install the available security updates. Microsoft has even released patches for operating systems that are no longer officially supported, including Windows Vista, Windows XP, and Windows Server 2003. If you’re a regular end-user running Windows 7 or older, you’re likely better off upgrading to a newer version of Microsoft for added security.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Link to original source

Microsoft's To-Do app is now available for Mac

Sponsored Links


Microsoft

Microsoft has released To-Do for Mac, finally giving Apple users access to the task management tool on their desktops. The Mac app will allow users to work offline, view their upcoming tasks under “My Day,” share to-do lists with friends and colleagues and see flagged emails. The app isn’t fully integrated with Microsoft Planner yet, but you can expect it soon. If you already use Microsoft To-Do on iOS, Android, Windows or the web, you’ll be able to sign-in to your account and access your tasks right on the Mac app.

A Mac option for Microsoft To-Do will be good news for any former devotees of Wunderlist, which the software giant purchased back in 2017 and (to no one’s surprise) discontinued in order to replace it with its own productivity tool. While some found the early version of Microsoft To-Do lacking, later updates added subtasks and list-sharing. To-Do also syncs with Outlook, an added perk for anyone who relies on the email app for work. If you want to give it a shot, you can download To-Do for Mac from the Mac App Store today.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Link to original source

FCC task force will help connect farms and ranches

Sponsored Links


BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI via Getty Images

Today, the FCC announced a task force meant to support the deployment of broadband across unserved farms and ranches. The Precision Ag Connectivity Task Force will work with the US Department of Agriculture and public and private sector stakeholders. It will be responsible for developing policy recommendations for rural, agriculture-focussed broadband. “As I’ve traveled the country, I’ve seen the amazing efficiencies, innovations, and improvements that high-speed Internet brings to today’s farms and ranches,” said FCC Chairman Ajit Pai. ” … This is the present and the future of American agriculture, and we must do whatever we can to support these producers and enhance precision agriculture.”

This spring the FCC pledged to bring broadband to more than 100,000 rural homes and businesses, and earlier this month, the FCC authorized $166.8 million to expand broadband access in underserved rural regions. It makes sense that the FCC would want to work with farmers and ranchers as it embarks on this rural push, especially given broadband’s potential to modernize agriculture.

But the FCC has more than a few wary critics. Earlier this year, the Commission said rural broadband access is improving “on a reasonable and timely basis” — though that claim was quickly disputed. Its efforts to bridge the digital divide have attracted more critics, who point to things like the agency’s recent vote to limit funds available for rural schools and libraries. There’s also doubt around the FCC’s data, suggesting fewer people have access to high-speed internet than the Commission lets on. While the new task force could give farmers and ranchers a say in broadband deployment, whether it will have any significant impact remains to be seen.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Link to original source

Grubhub is delivering Dunkin' donuts in New York City

Sponsored Links


Dunkin’

If you’re craving donuts but can’t step outside to get them, some extra relief might be at hand. Grubhub is rolling out the option to order from Dunkin’ through its apps, starting with Seamless customers in New York City. It’ll reach other markets in the months ahead, including Boston, Chicago and Philadelphia. Deliveries will be free between June 24th and June 30th to sweeten the deal (beyond the sugar in your orders, that is) for early adopters.

Dunkin’ is no stranger to online orders, but this is still a significant expansion — it’ll be an option in some of the most popular food delivery apps in the US. It’s also improtant if you’re a frequent Grubhub or Seamless customer. Between this and earlier deals with chains like Taco Bell, you won’t need a bevvy of apps to order food when you’re stuck at work.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Link to original source

The Morning After: 'Pokémon Go' cheaters never prosper

Sponsored Links


AP Photo/Amr Alfiky

Over the weekend, cheaters never prosper as the creators of Pokémon Go sues a group of cheaters who used hacked apps to breeze through games. (Conveniently, we also run through the history of video-game cheating through the decades.) And, while it may not be cheating, spies may have used an AI-generated face to infiltrate US politics. That’s a little more involved than the Konami code.


It might be your best chance to get the EV you want.
Tesla starts selling used Model 3 cars online

The EV maker has started selling used Model 3s online in the San Francisco Bay Area, and some of them are potentially good deals (if not as good as you often see with used cars). There’s some extra peace of mind here, too. As with Tesla’s existing in-person used-car sales, each vehicle goes through a 70-point inspection and comes with either a four-year, 50,000-mile warranty or a two-year, 100,000-mile warranty.


One selection of hacked apps is apparently ruining Niantic’s games.
Niantic sues group of alleged ‘Pokémon Go’ cheaters

Niantic is holding Global++ to account for its unauthorized versions of Pokémon Go, Ingress and even Harry Potter: Wizards Unite — which isn’t even out yet. The company says the modified mobile apps not only violate intellectual property rights but “undermine the integrity of the gaming experience.”


It’s all to allow teams to focus on the development of ‘New World’ and ‘Crucibles,’ apparently.
Amazon Game Studios reportedly lays off dozens in shake-up

Timing is everything, so why did Amazon decide to lay off dozens of its Game Studios employees on the last day of E3, the world’s biggest gaming show? The company reportedly told affected employees that they only have 60 days to find new positions within Amazon. If they fail to do so within that period, they’ll have to leave the company with (thankfully) a severance package in tow.

The company’s statement reads: “Amazon Game Studios is reorganizing some of our teams to allow us to prioritize development of New World, Crucible and new unannounced projects we’re excited to reveal in the future.”


We’ve come a long way from unplugging your sibling’s controller.
A brief history of cheating at video games

Andrew Tarantola takes us through the history of video-game cheating, from the Konami code all the way up to Valve’s Anti-Cheat system.

But wait, there’s more…


The Morning After is a new daily newsletter from Engadget designed to help you fight off FOMO. Who knows what you’ll miss if you don’t Subscribe.

Craving even more? Like us on Facebook or Follow us on Twitter.

Have a suggestion on how we can improve The Morning After? Send us a note.

All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

85
Shares

Share

Tweet

Share

Save




Comments

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Link to original source