Tinder adds sexual orientation feature to make swiping more inclusive

[unable to retrieve full-text content]

TwitterFacebook

Tinder has teamed up with GLAAD, an LGBTQ advocacy and non-discrimination group, to make swiping more inclusive.

Read more here. Read more…

More about Tech, Mashable Video, Lgbtq, Tinder, and Sex And Relationships

Link to original source

Tinder partners with GLAAD to make swiping more inclusive

Some of the new ways to display sexual orientation on Tinder.
Some of the new ways to display sexual orientation on Tinder.
Image: TINDER / GLAAD

Matching with potential partners online has never been easier. Since 2012, Tinder has been a go-to for single people trying to find everything from their next fling to a long-lasting relationship. 

Today, the dating app announced that it’s working to become more inclusive and help users express their sexuality. Just in time for Pride Month, Tinder teamed up with GLAAD to allow users to add more information on their sexual orientation to their profile. This way, the app can tailor their matches based on their sexual preferences. 

“We want all of our users to feel empowered expressing who they are while connecting with new people — and we’re always working to make that easier for our users on Tinder,” said Tinder CEO, Elie Seidman, in a statement. “Dating apps are invaluable platforms for connecting the LGBTQ community, and we’re beyond proud to continue our efforts, in partnership with GLAAD, to improve the community’s experience on Tinder.”

Users can edit their sexual orientation by going to “Edit Info” in the app. From there, they can tap “Orientation” to add up to three terms that they feel best represent their sexual orientation. 

Tinder offers many sexual orientations to choose from, including bisexual and asexual. Users can also check “show me people of the same orientation first” to further customize and streamline their swiping experience. 

You don't have to sacrifice your sexual orientation for swipes.

You don’t have to sacrifice your sexual orientation for swipes.

Image: TINDER / GLAAD

Users don’t have to feel pressure to make this information public, either. After adjusting the settings, it’s up to each person whether or not they want their orientation displayed on their profile. 

“Tinder continues to show a dedication to inclusivity with updates that reach millions of people and create safer spaces for LGBTQ users,” said GLAAD’s chief communications officer, Rich Ferraro, in a statement. “Their latest work to expand additional sexual orientation options is an impactful change that helps LGBTQ people authentically express their full selves and gives LGBTQ users more control over potential matches.”

The dating app rolled out this update after a study conducted by Tinder found that most LGBTQ users in the U.S. were looking for ways to easily display their sexual orientation on dating platforms. 

This update will become available to current users in the U.S., UK, Canada, Ireland, India, Australia and New Zealand throughout the month. Good news — from here on out, new users will have the sexual orientation feature available right when they sign up. 

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Link to original source

Tinder adds sexual orientation and gender identity to its profiles

Tinder is adding information about sexual orientation and gender identity to its profiles.

The company worked with the LGBTQ advocacy organization GLAAD on changes to its dating app to make it more inclusive.

Users who want to edit or add more information about their sexual orientation can now simply edit their profile. When a Tinder user taps on the “orientation” selection they can choose up to three terms that describe their sexual orientation. Those descriptions can either be private or public, but will likely be used to inform matches on the app.

Tinder has also updated the onboarding experience for new users so that they can include their sexual orientation as soon as they sign up for the dating app.

Tinder is also giving users more control over how they order matches. In the “Discovery Preferences” field Tinderers can choose to see people of the same orientation first.

The company said this is a first step in its efforts to be more inclusive. The company will continue to work with GLAAD to refine its products and is making the new features available in the U.S., U.K., Canada, Ireland, India, Australia and New Zealand throughout June.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Link to original source

Tinder will let you list your sexual orientation in your profile

Sponsored Links


8213erika via Getty Images

With the arrival of Pride month, dating app Tinder is making moves to be more welcoming to LGBT users for the event and beyond. In collaboration with GLAAD, the company has announced it will now let users list their sexual orientation in their profile.

Tinder is one of the most popular dating apps but does not have the best reputation among LGBT folks. Although users can filter who they want to match with, they don’t always work well. The inability for lesbian women to completely block men from matching with them, for example, has been a source of frustration.

With the new update, Tinder users can list their sexual orientation, which will determine who they match with. They can select up to three terms to describe their orientation.

Sexual Orientation on Tinder,

“We want all of our users to feel empowered expressing who they are while connecting with new people — and we’re always working to make that easier for our users on Tinder,” said Elie Seidman, CEO of Tinder. “Dating apps are invaluable platforms for connecting the LGBTQ+ community, and we’re beyond proud to continue our efforts, in partnership with GLAAD, to improve the community’s experience on Tinder.”

The update will be rolled out to the iOS and Android app for users in the US, UK, Canada, Ireland, Australia and New Zealand this month.

Source:
Tinder
In this article:

dating, entertainment, LGBT, mobile, sex, Tinder
All products recommended by Engadget are selected by our editorial team, independent of our parent company. Some of our stories include affiliate links. If you buy something through one of these links, we may earn an affiliate commission.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Link to original source

Tinder launches a new a la carte option, Super Boost, only for subscribers

Tinder this morning announced a second, more premium version of its most popular a la carte purchase, Boost, with the launch of Super Boost — an upgrade only offered to Tinder Plus and Tinder Gold premium subscribers. The idea with the new product is to extract additional revenues out of those users who have already demonstrated a willingness to pay for the dating app, while also offering others another incentive to upgrade to a paid Tinder subscription.

Similar to Boost, which puts you on top of the stack of profiles shown to potential matches for 30 minutes, Super Boost also lets you cut the line.

Tinder says the option will be shown to select Tinder Plus and Tinder Gold subscribers during peak activity times, and only at night. Once purchased and activated, Super Boost promises the chance to be seen by up to 100 times more potential matches. By comparison, Boost only increases profile views by up to 10 times.

Also like Boost, Super Boost may not have a set price point. Tinder prices its products dynamically, taking into account various factors like age, location, length of subscription, and other factors. (Tinder’s decision to up its pricing for older users led to an age discrimination class action lawsuit, which the company eventually settled. This limits its ability to price based on age, but only in California.)

The company hasn’t yet settled on a price point — or range — for Super Boost, but is now testing various options in the select markets where the feature is going live. Super Boost is not broadly available across all Tinder markets nor to all premium subscribers at this time, as the company considers this a test for the time being.

The addition, if successful, could have a big impact on Tinder’s bottom line.

As Tinder’s subscriber base grows, its a la carte purchases do the same — the company even noted they reached record levels in Q4 2018, when it also disclosed that a la carte accounts for around 30 percent of direct revenue. Boost and Super Like are the most popular, and Tinder has for a long time hinted that it wants to expand its menu of a la carte features as it grows.

During the first quarter of 2019, Tinder’s average subscribers were 4.7 million, up from 384,000 in the previous quarter and 1.3 million year-over-year. Its most recent earnings also topped estimates, thanks to Tinder’s continued growth, bringing parent company Match Group’s net income across its line of dating apps to $123 million, or 42 cents a share, up from $99.7 million, or 33 cents a share, in the year-ago period.

That said, the decision to monetize a user base against a built-in algorithm bias may be a long-term riskier bet for Tinder and other dating apps, who are already the subject of much cultural criticism thanks to articles lamenting their existence, damning documentaries, their connection to everything from racial discrimination to now eating disorders, as well as studies that demonstrate their unfair nature — like this most recent one from Mozilla.

For the near-term, dating app makers reliant on this model are raking in the profits due to a lack of other options. But there’s still room for a new competitor that could disrupt the status quo. Had Facebook not waited until its name had been dragged through the mud by way of its numerous privacy scandals, its Facebook Dating product could have been that disruptor. For now, however, Tinder and its rivals are safe — and its users will likely continue to pay for any feature offering them the ability to improve their chances.

Let’s block ads! (Why?)

Link to original source